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Otto by Eurwentala Otto by Eurwentala
A finished reconstruction of Otto the German baby theropod. The color was mostly inspired by baby ostriches.

More information about Otto in the lineart deviation: [link]


As a later addition: the species has now been named Sciurumimus albersdoerferi and confirmed to be a baby megalosauroid. It seems in reality it had ridiculously long tail feathers, not short ones like this picture.
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:iconniktiberius:
NikTiberius Featured By Owner Oct 26, 2014
I see in the comments about peoples scientific opinions on the drawing.. but I love this drawing how it is. ;_;  So Cute- I love how the tail is and the feathers. Whether it is "accurate" or not.. It is still an amazing drawing!!
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:iconlordofstamps:
LordOfstamps Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2014
Sadly sciurumimus was reclassified as a coelurosaur. There goes the possibility of feathered megalosaurus.
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:iconeurwentala:
Eurwentala Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2014
Well, the possibility hasn't gone anywhere, it's just that we don't have direct evidence now. Which is a shame. :) We do have multiple feathered ornitischians, though. So I think we have a fairly good justification for putting at least some filaments on any dinosaur now.
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:iconlordofstamps:
LordOfstamps Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2014
That is, if the structures on the ornitischians are homologous (which I personally doubt because they are rather quill-like)
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:iconeurwentala:
Eurwentala Featured By Owner Aug 3, 2014
Sure, it's in no way obvious they're homologous to feathers. I wouldn't be surprised if fuzz evolved separately multiple times - in pterosaurs, in ornitischians, in theropods, and perhaps somewhere else too. It seems to be fairly easy to evolve.

But have you seen the strctures of Kulindadromeus? It has soft, small, plumaceous structures that look a lot more like down feathers than quills.
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:iconlordofstamps:
LordOfstamps Featured By Owner Aug 3, 2014
I don't see why they couldn't have evolved independently. This issue could be settled once and for all if we find a Late Triassic dino with these structures.

Kulindadromeus has some structures that are rather unique such as the ribbon-like structures on the legs.
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:iconeurwentala:
Eurwentala Featured By Owner Aug 3, 2014
Yeah, they definitely could have evolved independently. Or not. We just don't know yet. :)

Finding a Late Triassic dino with preserved integument would sure help tremendously. I wonder if they could eventually find one in Madygen, the formation where Longisquama and Sharovipteryx were found.
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:iconshade0fchaos:
shade0fchaos Featured By Owner Nov 23, 2012
Well I definitely learned something new today! Very cool picture; would love to see more artwork on Sciurumimus albersdoerferi. If you do decide to another version feel free to let me know :)
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:iconshade0fchaos:
shade0fchaos Featured By Owner Nov 21, 2012
You're definitely a talented artist; love this picture except that Sciurumimus albersdoerferi did have a long feathers and it is believed to have ate insects. It wasn't until it matured into an adult Megalosaur that it is believed to have made the transition to meat-eater.
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:iconeurwentala:
Eurwentala Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2012
Thanks!
This was drawn before the critter got a formal description, and I already note in the description that the tail feathers are not accurate. I should draw it again with a proper squirrel tail at some point.

I think it has been pretty widely accepted that many dinosaurs took care of their young, at least for a while after hatching. A newly hatched Sciurumimus could not have hunted other dinosaurs by itself, but if it's mom did the killing, why not? Also, almost any generalist insectivore today will take advantage of a nice dead animal it happens across, so I'm fairly sure this would be considered normal behaviour in such a case too. I've seen pictures of great tits eating dead deer, for example.
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:icon8bitaviation:
8bitAviation Featured By Owner Oct 13, 2012
what did you use to colour?
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:iconeurwentala:
Eurwentala Featured By Owner Oct 15, 2012
It's water-soluble pencils, a small brush and a bit of water.
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:icon8bitaviation:
8bitAviation Featured By Owner Oct 15, 2012
ok, thanks :)
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:iconseverusblackpaw:
SeverusBlackpaw Featured By Owner Sep 30, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
awwww thats sooo cute :D
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:iconeurwentala:
Eurwentala Featured By Owner Oct 1, 2012
Thanks. :)
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:iconneustrasbourg:
NeuStrasbourg Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2012
Of course it's ridiculous for me to say this since I already knew you're from finland before looking at this, but I feel your illustration has a very "finnish" atmosphere. It reminds me of the illustrated wildlife guides in my grandpa's mökki. I could really picture this guy sitting among the blueberrys or on the beach of our lake :)
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:iconeurwentala:
Eurwentala Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2012
Thanks! I never really thought about that, but now that you say it, the old Finnish wildlife and plant guidebooks have been an important inspiration for me. I mean the ones that were standard schoolbooks during my mother's school years. I almost read them to pieces when I was little.

So you have relatives in Finland. Cool. :)
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:iconumbreon0001:
Umbreon0001 Featured By Owner Jul 15, 2012  Student General Artist
Oh, he's so cute! :D
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:iconkazuma27:
Kazuma27 Featured By Owner Jun 16, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Is a megalosaur? Is a carnosaur? Is a coelurosaur? Either way he(or she)'s beautiful ;)
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:iconeurwentala:
Eurwentala Featured By Owner Jun 17, 2012
We don't know yet, since he hasn't been formally described yet. He looks a lot like a compsognathid, something related to Juravenator or Sinosauropteryx. There has been some talk, though, suggesting compsognathids might not be a real group at all, but an assemblage of basal coelurosaurs and megalosaurs and creatures near their common ancestors. Maybe even babies of big megalosaurs looked like this.
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:iconkazuma27:
Kazuma27 Featured By Owner Jun 17, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
These days i tend to think that, if not all, most theropods had fuzz, at varying degrees depending on the environment, species and such, so i wouldn't rule out the possibility that maybe baby megalosaurs indeed looked like that...
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:iconeurwentala:
Eurwentala Featured By Owner Jun 17, 2012
My current strongest idea is that all archosaurs shared the genetic machinery for making filamentous integumentar structures, and multiple groups invented them separately: theropods, heterodontosaurs, ceratopsids, pterosaurs and most likely small crurotarsans too. Or, alternatively, feathers were already present in the ancestral archosaurs and were separately lost in some groups, though I find it hard to think why.

Any way, I think baby megalosaurs were most likely fluffy and could very well look like Otto. Though I'm not an expert, of course.
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:iconkazuma27:
Kazuma27 Featured By Owner Jun 17, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
I'd lean to the first theory too... By the way, i've heard some time ago, from a member of the Dinosaur Toy Forum if i'm not mistaken, that maybe Psittacosaurus' quills were more like elongated scales than something originated from protofetahers; don't remember from what paleontologist he heard it, though...
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:iconeurwentala:
Eurwentala Featured By Owner Jun 22, 2012
That's fully possible, I think. And since filamentous stuff evolved from scales at least twice, why not several times in different lineages? Though I think there hasn't yet been a formal publication about the psittacosaur matter.
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:iconkazuma27:
Kazuma27 Featured By Owner Jun 22, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Yeah, i think so...
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:iconolivethebreloom:
OliveTheBreloom Featured By Owner Jun 8, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Was he the exceptionally preserved fossil?
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:iconeurwentala:
Eurwentala Featured By Owner Jun 11, 2012
Yes, truly exceptional for an European fossil. He was all over the news for a while.
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:iconolivethebreloom:
OliveTheBreloom Featured By Owner Jun 11, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Apparently not my news. :/
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:icongogosardina:
Gogosardina Featured By Owner Apr 4, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Can't wait for the descriptive paper on this wonderful specimen! From what I've seen/heard behind-the-scenes, the taxonomic identity of Otto will have mindblowing implications given it has protofeathers.

Lovely rendition by the way!
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:iconeurwentala:
Eurwentala Featured By Owner Apr 4, 2012
Thanks!

I heard about it as well. If Otto belongs outside Coelurosauria, or more, is a juvenile megalosauroid, it would at least discard the most conservative estimates of feather evolution.
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:iconchrismasna:
ChrisMasna Featured By Owner Dec 2, 2011
Beautiful!
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:iconviergacht:
Viergacht Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2011  Professional General Artist
It's completely adorable (and I had an iguana named Otto, so it gets nostalgia points for that, too).
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:iconeurwentala:
Eurwentala Featured By Owner Nov 26, 2011
Thanks. :) I was going for the feeling I get looking at lion cubs eating with their faces covered in blood. Adorable and vicious at the same time.
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:iconpunasiirtyminen:
Punasiirtyminen Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2011
This is good work. Me like.
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:iconeurwentala:
Eurwentala Featured By Owner Nov 26, 2011
Thanks!
I'm pretty happy with it too.
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:iconzimices:
Zimices Featured By Owner Nov 21, 2011  Hobbyist
I really like it! By the way, if I didn't know that it is "Otto", I will think that is a Sinosauropteryx.
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:iconeurwentala:
Eurwentala Featured By Owner Nov 26, 2011
No wonder. They are very similar, and Juravenator too. Sinosauropteryx, though, is known to have been reddish or orangish brown in color with white rings on the tail. I gave Otto very different "baby ostrich" color theme to match with the hypothesis that Otto was a very young hatchling of some largish theropod species.
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:iconbabbletrish:
babbletrish Featured By Owner Nov 21, 2011  Professional Traditional Artist
Wonderful!
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:icontheflashisgone:
theflashisgone Featured By Owner Nov 21, 2011
I this any particular species, or just a generic theropod?
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:iconeurwentala:
Eurwentala Featured By Owner Nov 21, 2011
It's a particular species, but the fossil has not yet been described and thus the species doesn't have a name. At the moment it's only known by it's nickname, Otto. Photographs of the incredibly well-preserved fossil were recently released, and my drawing is based on them.

The pictures can be seen here, for example: [link]
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