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From the North came the Furry Tyrannosaurs by Eurwentala From the North came the Furry Tyrannosaurs by Eurwentala
Yutyrannus huali, the newly described giant feathered tyrannosauroid.

The title is a quote from a comic book story "Flesh" from 1977. Turns out there actually were furry tyrannosaurs in the north after all!

Yutyrannus lived during the Early Cretaceous in what is now China. The Yixian formation, from which the fossils of the new theropod were found, is famous for its beautifully preserved fossils, often with soft tissues such as fur or feathers.

At 9 meters long, Yutyrannus is the largest known dinosaur with feather impressions found so far. Importantly, it shows that even large species could be feathered. There's now one reason less to draw scaly Tyrannosaurus rexes.

The Yixian area at the time was temperate, yearly average temperatures being around 10 C. Freezing temperatures and snowfall during winter wouldn't have been very rare.

It has been suggested that later analyses might show Yutyrannus is actually a carchantodontosaur instead of a tyrannosaur. If it's true, it would be a major new piece of evidence in favor of early origin of feathers, since carchantodontosaurs are much more distant relatives to birds than tyrannosaurs.

We live in interesting times.
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:icon8bitaviation:
What I think is really amazing about this painting is that you really show where it's habitat was. you can see that it was very cold, because of the snowy background, and the warm air coming from it's nostrils makes it very realistic. The colouration of the dinosaur is very likely, because it lived in a snowy climate and could have used it white colour to camouflage, for an ambush. The way you have drawn Yutyrannus makes it look less like a huge fluffy monster, to a beautifully feathered, kingly creature, much like a lion.

overall, I think you got the colours really good, the crest looks really nice, and I think you put a whole lot of effort into this, great job!
What do you think?
The Artist thought this was FAIR
25 out of 25 deviants thought this was fair.

:icontassietyger:
This is beyond words; it truly captures the grand majestic dynasty of the tyrannosaur line of birds. Not only you have captured the handsome profile that a Yutyrannus huali cock would have been in life (I love how you did the feathers! Makes me want to brush my hand through it), but also a mystical feel to it, as if this is screaming that dragons of China did indeed exist. And I can sense of character to this male, with his eye coxing at us, as if to expect us to pay respect to him as he is the Lord.
What do you think?
The Artist thought this was FAIR
21 out of 21 deviants thought this was fair.

The Artist has requested Critique on this Artwork

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:iconterizinosaurus:
Terizinosaurus Featured By Owner Jul 19, 2015
:)
Reply
:iconjohn-smith-guanlong:
John-Smith-Guanlong Featured By Owner Jun 19, 2015  New Deviant
Awe-inspiring design! Yutyrannus here looks vaguely wolf-like. Was that intentional?
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:iconsurfersquid:
surfersquid Featured By Owner Jan 3, 2015
This is gorgeous! I absolutely love your interpretation of this species. It looks so fluffy, I really want to hug it!
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:icondiscordthegreat:
DiScOrDtheGrEaT Featured By Owner Dec 15, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Oh he's beautiful!~
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:iconthisguydraws:
ThisGuyDraws Featured By Owner Dec 8, 2014  Student Artist
This is my absolute favorite reconstruction of Yutyrannus and I've seen some pretty good ones. The use of colour is definitely, to me, the strongest element of the piece. Both in the colour scheme of the animal and the colours of the environment. In my mind this is what Yutyrannus looked liked (unless science says otherwise).
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:iconlordofstamps:
LordOfstamps Featured By Owner Aug 10, 2014
Any fanboy who says "feathered dinos r dumb!111!" needs to see this picture.
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:iconthemeekwarrior:
TheMeekWarrior Featured By Owner Jul 15, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Love the face detail and shape. Awesome. :D
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:iconeurwentala:
Eurwentala Featured By Owner Jul 15, 2014
Thanks! :)
Reply
:iconthemeekwarrior:
TheMeekWarrior Featured By Owner Jul 15, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
You're welcome! c:
Reply
:iconjonagold2000:
JonaGold2000 Featured By Owner Apr 9, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Winter is comming.
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:iconpfunkei:
Pfunkei Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2014
The title reminded me of the line in You Are Umasou that referred to "the gluttonous long necks from the south". Beautiful painting by the way :)
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:iconangelanovus:
angelanovus Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
beautiful! :)
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:iconsketcherjak:
sketcherjak Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2013
Love this! Yes!

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:iconmissutahraptor:
MissUtahraptor Featured By Owner Sep 9, 2013
I like the colours- grey&blue reminds me of winter, so I can easily imagine this dinosaur walking in the snow, cold wind blowing.... Thumbs Up 
Reply
:iconthearbl:
TheARBL Featured By Owner Sep 2, 2013
An excellent interpretation of a feathered tyrannosauroid!
Reply
:iconhybridthesharkasaus:
hybridtheSharkasaus Featured By Owner Aug 31, 2013  Student Artist
I feel like he would be saying " winter is coming"
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:iconwhiskerfacerumpel:
WhiskerfaceRumpel Featured By Owner Aug 15, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
There is something almost magical to him. 
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:iconeurwentala:
Eurwentala Featured By Owner Aug 15, 2013
Thanks! :)
Reply
:iconwhiskerfacerumpel:
WhiskerfaceRumpel Featured By Owner Aug 17, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
It is amazing, and you're welcome. 
Reply
:iconwhiskerfacerumpel:
WhiskerfaceRumpel Featured By Owner Aug 15, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
This is beautiful! 
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:icondragoroku:
DragoRoku Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2013
Feathery!
Reply
:iconninjamonkey38:
NinjaMonkey38 Featured By Owner Dec 25, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
This is impressive. I like it!
Reply
:iconeurwentala:
Eurwentala Featured By Owner Dec 26, 2012
Thanks! :)
Reply
:iconninjamonkey38:
NinjaMonkey38 Featured By Owner Dec 26, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Anytime!
Reply
:iconzoetaylor11:
ZoeTaylor11 Featured By Owner Dec 4, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
Wow! Awesome piece!
Reply
:iconeurwentala:
Eurwentala Featured By Owner Dec 4, 2012
Thank you. :) It sure took a long time to paint.
Reply
:iconsaberrex:
Saberrex Featured By Owner Sep 13, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Wooly Tyrannosaurs. never gets old.
Reply
:iconnovablue:
novablue Featured By Owner Sep 13, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Gorgeous! :D
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:iconeurwentala:
Eurwentala Featured By Owner Sep 28, 2012
Thanks!
Reply
:icontrygon24:
Trygon24 Featured By Owner Sep 6, 2012
Proof that a feathered theropod can look absolutely majestic and imposing respect.

Beautiful :love:
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:iconeurwentala:
Eurwentala Featured By Owner Sep 28, 2012
Thank you! :)
Reply
:iconmugenseiryuu:
MugenSeiRyuu Featured By Owner Aug 1, 2012
Beautiful feathered Tyrant!
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:iconeurwentala:
Eurwentala Featured By Owner Aug 10, 2012
Thanks!
Reply
:iconguilmon182:
guilmon182 Featured By Owner Jul 31, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Oooohhh!!!
Reply
:iconnightrunner13:
nightrunner13 Featured By Owner Jun 30, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
yutyrannus is a new fav dinosaur of mine, i may not draw it till i get more practice with my tablet though.. but i can firmly say no amount of practice will make it turn out as beautifully as this piece of art.
Reply
:iconsylxeriaguardian:
SylxeriaGuardian Featured By Owner Apr 13, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
I think this deserves a Daily Deviation. How does one go about nominating a deviation as one...?
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:iconfanny-g:
Fanny-G Featured By Owner Apr 11, 2012  Student Photographer
Superbe ! Les détails sont bien visibles !
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:icon8bitaviation:
8bitAviation Featured By Owner Apr 11, 2012
I think this is amazing, the way you did the feathers, the crest looks fantastic, and... and... AAAAAAAAAUUUUUUUGGGGGGGHHHH SO AWESOME!!!!
Reply
:iconclojo-733:
Clojo-733 Featured By Owner Apr 9, 2012  Student Filmographer
The detail of the fur is beautiful :meow:
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:iconeurwentala:
Eurwentala Featured By Owner Apr 10, 2012
Thanks!
Reply
:icondrachenvuur:
Drachenvuur Featured By Owner Apr 8, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
This is incredible. I love the tyrannosaur's expression, it's feathers; the way they're fluffed up against the cold. Great job!
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:iconeurwentala:
Eurwentala Featured By Owner Apr 10, 2012
Thank you. :)
Reply
:iconghostinthepines:
GhostInThePines Featured By Owner Apr 8, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Maybe now the "American deinonychosauria had advanced feathers because the Chinese Paraves had advanced feathers" argument will go away... at least both Tyrannosaurs and Carcharodontosaurs have species found in North America, so there shouldn't be any geographic barriers for feather evolution coming from those lines.
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:iconeurwentala:
Eurwentala Featured By Owner Apr 10, 2012
I'm not quite sure what you mean. "American deinonychosauria had advanced feathers because the Chinese Paraves had advanced feathers" is a pretty good argument.

Anyway, there's no real reason to think any of the North American coelurosaurs were featherless just because they didn't happen to be preserved in a sediment that shows feathers. Though I suppose the tyrannosaurs and other largish species living in warmer climates had a thinner feather coat, maybe with bald or scaly patches. Ostriches have large portions of their undersides featherless, and I suppose it's because of the heat.
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:iconghostinthepines:
GhostInThePines Featured By Owner Apr 10, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
I should have been more specific...

Using North American coelursaurs as a reason for feathered American deinonychosauria is a legitimate argument. But using traits of a genetically advanced group that does not appear in the known fossil records of North America is not. If the Avialae group (which is where most of these Chinese Paraves I see in arguments are classified) does not appear in North America, it doesn't matter if its species are older than the American deinonychosaurs. There's no proof that Avialae genetics made it to the American continent before the continent broke away from the rest of the landmasses during the Jurassic period.

I'm not expecting feather impressions, but I would at least expect one version of an American Anchiornis or Archaeopteryx. We have tiny mammal fossils from America, so I don't accept the argument that they were too small to fossilize as the reason why one of these Avialae species hasn't been found here yet.
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:iconeurwentala:
Eurwentala Featured By Owner Apr 10, 2012
Oh, now I get it. I think.

But many of the Chinese feathered coelurosaurs are in fact pretty basal in the family tree. There are advanced (pennaceous) feathers known from all three branches of Paraves (dromaeosaurs, troodontids and avialans) and outside it from Oviraptorosauria. Their lineages sure diverged, and thus, advanced feathers had to evolve, well before the continents were properly separated.

It seems that the basal condition for Paravians was being small and four-winged (since the basal members of all three branches look like this), so it's not like they were really advanced. On the contrary, the large, obviously flightless deinonychosaurs of North America were the derived sort.

Another thing is whether small bird-like paravians ever were common in North America. It's not like they are completely absent from the North American fossil locations: they are just mostly known from such crappy fossils that they are not as well known. There is Palaeopteryx, which is only known from a single bone fragment. And Koparion, which is a single tiny troodontid tooth. Apparently, there are literally buckets of small maniraptoran teeth, but since there are no bones to go with them, they can't be identified.

But it doesn't really matter if the small species were there or not. Pennaceous feathers evolved before the split between Oviraptorosauria and Paraves, and regardless of their basalness or derivedness, all oviraptorosaurs, troodontids, dromaeosaur and avialans would have inherited advanced feathers from their ancestors.
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:iconghostinthepines:
GhostInThePines Featured By Owner Apr 10, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
That's all very true. But with flightlessness usually comes a change in feather appearance. Ostriches, emus, kiwis, etc have feathers that behave more like their primitive forerunners than those of modern birds. And penguin feathers barely seem like feathers at all despite not being the only group of aquatic birds. If dromaeosaurs aren't using their feathers for flight purposes, how much like their flying forefathers would their feather structure and growth actually look after a few tens of millions of years? Their evolution didn't stop, after all.
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:iconeurwentala:
Eurwentala Featured By Owner Apr 10, 2012
I agree about that. It's not likely that animals which had been too large to fly or glide for tens of millions of years had fully operational wings left. But it's not just the North American species, but all large, flightless paravians. And I still don't get what Yutyrannus has to do with the matter, since it didn't have such feathers to begin with.

How much of the wings or tail feathers, for example, was actually left is a tougher question. We do know Velociraptor had some sort of wing feathers, since it had quill knobs on its' arms. A recent study suggested it still had at least small wings and used them to balance on prey animals, much as birds or prey do today. And then there are ornamental feathers, of course. Ostriches (and oviraptorosaurs) retained advanced feathers at least partly for show.

I think it's fully possible as well that the larger, flightless paravians would have looked more furry than feathery, provided they had no use for wings.
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:iconrushinroulette:
RushinRoulette Featured By Owner Apr 8, 2012
Found the comic strip that says it: [link]

I saw it once before. Now it's true XD
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:iconzombiesaurian:
ZombieSaurian Featured By Owner Apr 8, 2012  Student Digital Artist
I'm leaning towards an Allosauriod, I've taken a look and heard what other paleontologists ahve said and I'm pretty convinced it's not a Tyrannosauriod, nontheless I think it's an even MORE exciting discovery if it were truely to be an Allosauriod! This is still fantastic art and I love this drawing!
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April 7, 2012
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